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Can you receive SSD benefits for suffering bipolar disorder?

Suffering from a mental condition is often a challenging time for individuals in Florida and elsewhere. Being diagnosed with a serious mental illness, such a bipolar disorder, can greatly alter a person's life. Although the person may understand that their life is difficult or challenging, they might not recognize themselves as disabled. Nonetheless, this mental condition can be debilitating, causing some to be unable to work. In these cases, individuals might want to seek out their options when it comes to Social Security disability.

Can you receive SSD benefits for suffering bipolar disorder? This mental condition can cause mood episodes. And during these mood episodes, individuals can find it difficult to hold down a job, socialize or even live their normal life. In these matters, it can be helpful to receive SSD benefits to help offset the financial challenges caused by these mood episodes.

To qualify for SSD benefits for bipolar disorder, an applicant must first meet the financial requirements. If an applicant is making $900 per month or more after allowable deductions, he or she generally will not be considered disabled. However, if an applicant is not working or is earning less than $900 per month, the SSA will look at the medical condition to determine if the applicant meets other requirements.

The SSA must also evaluate the nature of the person's condition. If the impairment or combination of impairments suffered significantly limits the applicant physically or mentally, making it difficult to do basic work activities, the SSA may find the person qualified to receive benefits. Basic work activities include walking, sitting, seeing and even remembering.

With regard to bipolar disorder, an applicant must meet the defined terms of this disability to receive SSD benefits. This is typically marked by depressive and manic characterizations. In addition to meeting this definition, an applicant must also prove that he or she is unable to do the work they did previously and cannot do any other type of work.

The application process can be lengthy and complex; however, those seeking to get disability benefits for a mental condition, should understand their rights and options.

Source: Psychcentral.com, "Do You Qualify for Social Security Disability Pay?" Joe Kraynak, accessed April 9, 2017

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