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Severity and frequency of skin disorder may affect SSD

There are a number of medical conditions that can affect an individual's skin. Amongst these are ichthyosis, bullous disease, dermatitis, and Hidradenitis Suppurativa. Even burns can seriously damage one's skin. Being the largest organ of the body, serious harm to one's skin can leave him or her in rough physical condition. Serious pain and suffering may result, but the severity and longevity of the condition could also significantly disrupt one's personal and professional lives. This includes an individual's ability to work. Those who are unable to work may qualify for Social Security disability benefits, though, which could provide a lot of financial relief.

In order to obtain SSD benefits, an individual must meet the federal requirements that are applicable to their condition or injury. When it comes to skin, the SSA typically assesses the severity of skin lesions, the frequency with which the condition appears, and how the pain of the individual's condition limits his or her ability to perform certain tasks. Also, the SSA will look to see what treatments are available, which one's have been sought out, and how those treatments affect the condition.

With this in mind, an individual with a skin disorder needs to be sure to develop a strong claim. Medical documentation can help evidence the severity and frequency of skin lesions. This documentation might also help evidence how the skin condition affects an individual's life. For example, if medical records show that skin lesions frequently occur on the joints, then they may be more likely to hinder movement.

A disabled individual's SSD benefits claim may be granted or denied based on the evidence provided. Therefore, those who need assistance showing the true scope of their skin condition may want to carefully consider the SSA's regulations and, if desired, seek help from a qualified attorney.

Source: Social Security Administration, "8.00 Skin Disorders - Adult," accessed on Oct. 10, 2016

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