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Important points prior to filing for Florida SSD benefits

Social Security Disability (SSD) is vital for a great many Floridians to make ends meet and afford upkeep and care after they have suffered from an illness, condition or injury. Many, however, are not fully aware of the requirements that must be followed when pursuing benefits. There are important points that must be remembered when moving forward with an application. If these points are followed, there will be less of a chance that the applicant will be denied Social Security due to a technical error.

When given an appointment, the representative from the Social Security Administration (SSA) will conduct an interview and complete the application. It will either be done over the telephone or at the local office. It takes a minimum of one hour. The process can be expedited by commencing with the application over the internet. It will still be necessary to have the face-to-face appointment. The SSA will decide on disability if the claimant is not able to do substantial work and the problem has lasted or is expected to last for a minimum of one year, or result in death.

Many claimants might be under the impression that if a doctor says they are disabled, then that will be sufficient. That is not the case. Other forms of evidence must be presented.

Some people are already receiving disability benefits from work or through a separate agency. It is not automatic that SSD will be granted if benefits are being provided to the claimant from another source. The decision will be made within 3 to 5 months from when the application for SSD benefits is made. The decision is based on experts in the medical and vocational field who will discuss the case with the claimant's doctors and other locations where treatment was received. It is possible that the claimant will need to fill out more forms or have medical testing done.

Available benefits include Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI). The former is for workers who have been injured, disabled spouses who are left behind, and children disabled before the age of 22. The latter is for those who have limited income and resources. While this is an overview of what must be done before filing for benefits, it can also be helpful to have legal advice regarding benefits and in filling out the application correctly.

Source: SocialSecurity.gov, "What You Should Know Before You Apply For Social Security Disability Benefits," accessed on Aug. 10, 2015

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