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Important facts about Social Security disability

For those in Florida who are applying for or have already received an approval for Social Security disability benefits, there are certain issues that often arise and must be considered. Claimants often wonder when the payments will begin, how they will be paid, what to do if there is a decision made by the Social Security Administration that is not agreed with, and if taxes must be paid on benefits. Knowing the facts about disability can help to avoid any confusion with the benefits.

The payments will not begin until the disability has been in place for at least five months. The payments will begin in the sixth month. Once you have been approved to receive SSD benefits, you will also receive information as to how much you will receive and when the payments will commence. The payments will continue while you have the medical issue or condition and you are not able to work. This does not mean that the payments will continue for an indefinite period. If you are able to recover, then there will not be a need for the disability payments. You must inform the SSA if you are able to work, if you go back to work or if your medical issue improves.

There are times when there is a claimant who is denied Social Security or a decision is made after the benefits have been awarded that might be considered unfair or wrong. There could be confusion about the payments. The request to appeal must be made within 60 days of the date the confirmation letter was received. If the answer you receive is not satisfactory, then there are other options you can pursue.

Taxes might have to be paid for benefits. Approximately one-third of those who are awarded benefits must pay taxes. This is because they have substantial income on top of the benefits. If you are earning more than $25,000 and are filing as an individual, you will have to pay taxes. For joint returns, you might have to pay if the combined income surpasses $32,000. Married people who file separately will likely have to pay taxes for benefits.

There are often many questions that a claimant has regarding Social Security disability. Discussing the matter with a legal professional experienced in Social Security disability cases can provide assistance with questions about the process from beginning to end.

Source: ssa.gov, "What You Need To Know When You Get Social Security Disability Benefits," accessed on May 26, 2015

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